DIE WALKÜRE
Revivals

DIE WALKÜRE
Richard Wagner
1813 - 1883
Libretto by the composer
First performed June 26th 1870, Königliches Hof- und Nationaltheater, Munich

Sung in German with surtitles
Duration: c. 5 hrs. with two intervals


About the piece

The disc continues to turn. But the distruction of nature, inseperably in step with civilisation, has grown in size. The world as ...
The disc continues to turn. But the distruction of nature, inseperably in step with civilisation, has grown in size. The world ash tree, from which Wotan broke his spear, is shown as a tree stump, a portent of things to come. The tree’s rings remind us of time that has past and the finite nature of all life. Finality or intermediate phase? Pause in war, armistice, lull before the storm? The Valkyries transform fallen heros into machines of death. Brutalization has spread. Even the God becomes part of the atrocity, killing his own son and destroying his daughter’s existence. But there is a Nevertheless, an On the Other Hand: after the cool, mystic blue of the Rheingold set more natural colours now come into play, leading the way to more real, more human dimensions. The god created hardship, but he turns himself to those seeking for help. Although the relationships are desolate and the situation dismal, it is not hopeless. A way out is hinted at...
FROM NOTES BY THE STAGE DESIGNER JENS KILIAN ABOUT DIE WALKÜRE

Synopsis

Wotan hopes that a free hero, one who is not answerable to the gods, will carry out what he is not allowed to do: win back the Rin ...
Wotan hopes that a free hero, one who is not answerable to the gods, will carry out what he is not allowed to do: win back the Ring des Nibelungen, made by Alberich – which is now in Fafner’s possession. To this end he sired the twins Siegmund and Sieglinde with a mortal woman, and Erda bore him Brünnhilde, who is building an army of fallen heros with her eight half sisters, the Valkyries. An exhausted, wounded, unarmed man collapses in a stranger’s house and is tended by the woman who lives there. When her husband Hunding returns he realises that the man is the enemy he was seeking to kill. He grants him hospitality for the night but says they will fight in the morning. The wife gives her husband a sleeping draught. She and the stranger fall deeply in love, although she realises that he must be her twin brother, from whom she became separated as a small child. The stranger’s father had promised him that he would find a sword when he was in mortal danger. This sword is there, thrust into an oak tree by a stranger long ago, he pulls it out. Sieglinde reveals her name and calls him Siegmund. – But higher powers are to decide his fate. Wotan’s wife Fricka insists that Wotan punish the pair for their incest. The god must turn his back on Siegmund, his own son. Going against her father’s instruction Brünnhilde tries to help Siegmund in his battle with Hunding but Wotan’s spear shatters Siegmund’s sword. Wotan punishes Brünnhilde for her disobedience by depriving her of her divinity and putting her to sleep surrounded by a ring of fire until a hero is brave enough to wake her. Wotan was told by Brünnhilde that Sieglinde is expecting a child by Siegmund. So hope remains.


Supported by Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen Sponsorenlogo Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen
Performances

Sunday 27.01.2013

Further performances:
08.02.2013

Cast

Conductor
Sebastian Weigle
Director
Vera Nemirova
Assistant for the Revival
Hans Walter Richter
Orest Tichonov
Set Designer
Jens Kilian
Costume Designer
Ingeborg Bernerth
Lighting Designer
Olaf Winter
Dramaturge
Malte Krasting
Video
Bibi Abel

Siegmund
Frank van Aken
Hunding
Ante Jerkunica
Wotan
Terje Stensvold
Sieglinde
Dara Hobbs
Brünnhilde
Rebecca Teem
Fricka
Tanja Ariane Baumgartner
Gerhilde
Anja Fidelia Ulrich
Ortlinde
Britta Stallmeister
Waltraute
Nina Tarandek
Schwertleite
Katharina Magiera
Helmwige
Elizabeth Reiter
Siegrune
Lisa Wedekind
Grimgerde
Jie Zhang
Rossweiße
Stine Marie Fischer

Orchestra of Oper Frankfurt


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