CHOWANSCHTSCHINA /<br /> KHOVANSHCHINA
Revivals

CHOWANSCHTSCHINA /
KHOVANSHCHINA

Modest Mussorgski
1839 - 1881
Folk drama in five acts, libretto by Shostakovitch
Frankfurt production, Shostakovitch edition, final scene after Igor Stravinsky, Paris, 1913

Sung in Russian with German surtitles
Duration: c. 4 hrs. incl. one interval

About the work

»Fifty years of Russian history in one evening« - Mussorgsky’s monumental operatic legacy. Khovanshchina - »the scandals of ...
»Fifty years of Russian history in one evening« - Mussorgsky’s monumental operatic legacy. Khovanshchina - »the scandals of the Khovansky family«, dates back to the late 17th century. Before Peter the First was crowned, Russia was in a state of confusion and threatened to descend into chaos because of the conflict between the Raskolniki (»Old Believers«), the Strelitzen (Ivan the Terrible’s army) and boyars (representatives of the duma). Mussorgsky composed an historical work in five acts. He avoided sticking to a strict narrative line by using loosely connected tableaux, which combine to provide a vivid picture of events: the collision of these tableaux results in »The Russian people being unconsciously at the mercy of the grindingly constant shifting of disparate blocks of power« (Julia Spinola). The composer did not complete the opera. Mussorgsky’s powerful music is performed in an edition by Shostakovitch – without his finale, which is replaced by one reconstructed by Stravinsky from Mussorgsky’s sketches.

Synopsis

Moscow 1682 – 89: Chowanski, leader of the Streletsy, seeks the people’s favour by presenting himself as a benefactor and protec ...
Moscow 1682 – 89: Chowanski, leader of the Streletsy, seeks the people’s favour by presenting himself as a benefactor and protector of Moscow. His son Andrei trys to violate Emma, a german protestant girl he has abducted but Marfa, his former mistress, prevents him. Father and son squabble over the girl. Dosifei rescues her and prays to God to save old Russia. Prince Golizyn has received letters warning him that he is on shaky ground. Unsettled that he might lose the Tsarina and power, he returns to his roots and asks Marfa, who possesses the art of prophesy, to predict his future. She tells him that he will soon lose everything. Horrified, he dismisses her and orders that she be murdered. As if smelling blood Chowanski arrives, followed by Dosifei. They argue about power and Russia’s future. Schaklowity bursts in with news that the Streletsy are in revolt, and that Peter I is retaliating mercilessly. The people watch Golizyn being sent into exile. It ends with the ultra orthodox believers, unable to escape Peter’s men, building their own funeral pyres. Marfa bewitches Andrei with her fanaticism and, although he could try and escape, he is drawn to join them as they give their souls to the flames.


Supported by Frankfurter Patronatsverein - Sektion OperSponsorenlogo Frankfurter Patronatsvereins - Sektion Oper
Performances

Sunday 28.10.2012 18:00 h

Further performances

Opera house
Subscription: series 10

Pre-booking and Pricing

Cast

Conductor
Lawrence Foster
Director
Christian Pade
Assistant for the Revival
Orest Tichonov
Set and Costume Design
Alexander Lintl
Lighting Design
Olaf Winter
Dramaturge
Norbert Abels
Chorus and Extra Chorus Master
Matthias Köhler
Children's Chorus Master
Felix Lemke

Fürst Iwan Chowanski
Askar Abdrazakov
Fürst Andrej Chowanski
John Daszak
Fürst Wassili Golizyn
Frank van Aken
Bojar Schaklowiti
Ilya Silchukov
Dosifej
Clive Bayley
Marfa
Daveda Karanas
Schreiber
Hans-Jürgen Lazar
Emma
Barbara Zechmeister
Warsonofjew, Vertrauter Golizyns
Gerhard Singer
Kuska
Michael McCown
1. Schütze
Gerhard Singer
2. Schütze
Grigorij Kulba
Streschnew, ein junger Bojar
Pere Llompart
Susanna
Britta Stallmeister

Chorus and Extra Chorus
Orchestra of Oper Frankfurt


 
Copyright © 2013 Oper Frankfurt